skechers razor excess 2 cover
RoadShoe Reviews

Skechers Razor Excess 2 Review: Still Hype for Hyper Burst

What You Need To Know

  • Weighs 7.9 oz. (223 g.) for a US M9 / 5.7 oz. (162 g.) for a US W7
  • It’s blue, da ba dee, da ba dye
  • Hyper Burst is still worth the hype
  • The H-plate seems like style rather than substance
  • Available now for $140

ROBBE: Skechers is back with another version of the Razor, as it continues to milk the golden goose that laid the fortune cookies, or whatever. For the true running shoe nerd, the original Skechers Razor was one of those legendary shoes with pure running bliss infused into its supercritical midsole (i.e., Hyper Burst). It was simple, lightweight, fast, and, most importantly — fun. It was also a signature model of Meb Keflezighi, so technically, it was the GOmeb Razor. (Skechers has never been known for its finesse in naming conventions.)

In any case, over the years, we’ve seen many variations of the Razor, including the Razor Elite (we’ll allow it), Razor+ (please stop using math operators), and Razor Excess (meh). They also have GOrun in their names because Skechers refuses to let go of that paperweight.

Despite the sus naming conventions, the shoes have been quite nice, and credit where credit is due — Skechers was doing supercritical foam way before every other brand copied it. With that head start, it’s been able to fine-tune the formula over the years to some varying degrees of success. Here’s where I pitch the Skechers Maxroad 5 as the best overall shoe of 2021: The Skechers Max Road 5 was the best all-around running shoe of 2021.

Back to the Razor. Skechers knew it had a good thing, so it started putting plates anywhere they’d fit, lowering the stack, raising the stack, making tweaks on the upper, and now we have a bunch of Razors running all over the place, like a skatepark taken over by scooters.

I’m not going to cover all the other versions, but I’ll give you the lowdown on the Razor Excess 2. First off, not much has changed since the first version, save for some extra stack height (now 34mm in the heel, 30mm in the toe) and the addition of a forefoot carbon-infused H-Plate. The upper is slightly modified but remains a breathable mono mesh and polyester mix. The outsole still features decent coverage of Goodyear rubber. I believe this version also features a new Arch Fit insole, providing “podiatrist-certified arch support.” As with the first version, the Razor Excess 2 features Hyper Arc, giving the shoe a rockered ride.

Let’s get into the review.

JAYTON: When you think lightweight trainer with a carbon-infused winglet-forefoot-plate, Skechers might not be the first brand that comes to mind. Only a year after the first version, the Razor Excess 2 is what feels like mostly an upper update with some tweaks to the tongue.

skechers razor excess 2 laces

The Good

ROBBE: I usually start with the design of the shoe, but I can’t get behind this weird Derek Zoolander jungle thing, so I’m just gonna skip to the ride.

Skechers Hyper Burst is still a super solid foam. It probably has a couple of years of life left before it becomes the next Boost, but Skechers has done supercritical better than anyone else and at a cheaper price. Hoka tried it and failed miserably in the Mach Supersonic, though it dialed it in right with the Tecton X. Brooks did a pretty fine job with the Hyperion Tempo but dropped the ball on the Glycerin 20. Skechers just gets it right every time.

The Excess 2 is no exception. The Hyper Burst midsole feels mighty fine on the run, and its comfort/pop combo is only accentuated by the rocker geometry of the Hyper Arc. I took the shoe out for 8 miles, and it cruises along quite nicely. Turnover is exceptional and similar to the feeling you get from the Saucony Endorphin Speed. It’s not a soft midsole, but it’s also not firm. It hits a sweet spot that most runners will enjoy, especially if you like to pick it up.

I will say, Skechers has nailed the lightweight category with comfort and speed. The versatility of its shoes may be the best in the industry. I felt that the Maxroad 5 could handle everything from easy days to tempo runs or even marathons in a pinch, and I feel the same about the Razor Excess 2. Anything under half marathon (really, you could take this to marathon if you wanted to), tempo runs, daily training — it can pretty much do it all.

I’m not sure if I felt the effect of the H-Plate when I picked up the tempo, but the shoe does pick up effortlessly. For a pretty high stack, it’s also surprisingly stable.

I can’t attest to the durability of the Goodyear rubber on the outsole though I’ll say it is very thin. If your gait is off in the slightest degree, I’d expect portions of the outsole to wear out within 100 miles (I’ve also seen it happen in fewer miles in other shoes). That said, Hyper Burst is pretty durable overall, so even if it’s exposed, it’ll still hold up — it just won’t be great cosmetically.

For $140, you’re getting a decent substitute for the Saucony Endorphin Speed or other max-cushion tempo shoes.

JAYTON: The pattern on the upper is unique, and I dig it. Blue zebra is something I can totally get behind. The upper and the tongue update are extremely comfortable and breathable, which is something I’m looking forward to as we enter summer. I enjoyed the Hyper Burst midsole as it provided a good amount of cushioning but maintained stability with only a 4mm drop. The Goodyear rubber on the outsole offers a lot of traction in all conditions while not adding too much weight to the shoe (just over 7 ounces total).

JORDYNN: Just like the Speed Freek, the Razor Excess 2 is a very versatile shoe. It fits my foot nicely and has a snug lacing setup. If you know me by now, you know I don’t like loose toe boxes or heel slippage — I want to be one with my shoe. The cushioning is amazingly soft, even with the Pebax plate that I could barely feel. During my sprint drills and warm-ups, the shoe provided a great push off from my toes because of the rockered design, and I didn’t experience much toe drag. I also wore this shoe during a few long runs and never felt my feet get tired or achy. The foam is very springy, and I was able to keep a continuous bounce in my step.

Shop Skechers Razor Excess 2 – Men Shop Skechers Razor Excess 2 – Women

skechers razor excess 2 outsole

The Bad

ROBBE: Well, I only ran one 8-mile run in this shoe for a reason. I absolutely hate the most recent class of Skechers uppers. In fact, the upper was a significant ding on the Max Road 5, which really soured what would’ve been a sublime running experience for me. The mono mesh/polyester blend thing they have going on is stiff and scratchy and, to be quite frank — seems cheap.

I say the most recent class, but now that I think about it, I’m pretty sure this is an issue I’ve had with all of the uppers on lightweight Skechers shoes.

Long story short, I got blisters on the inside of both big toes over the course of one run, something that has never happened to me before. Now, I do tend to get hot spots in these areas, but not all the time, and I’ve never gotten blisters unless I was doing an ultra. However, I almost always get hotspots in any Skechers shoe I wear. Needless to say, I didn’t wear the shoe again.

Also, I’m not a huge fan of the new Arch Fit insole, though I could see some people appreciating it. I got major Nike React Infinity vibes which was a literal thorn in my side with that shoe. Unlike the Infinity React, which has a structural arch support piece, this support is integrated into the insole shape, so I expect it will compress over time. But you can definitely feel it in the beginning, and if you’re not used to that, it can be a bit annoying.

Lastly, I can’t handle this weird black and blue, bruised Zebra design. I imagine some people will like it, but unlike other wacky designs that work (Brandblack Kaiju), this one looks like it’s trying too hard.

JAYTON: Not necessarily bad but the winglet forefoot plate was meh. I don’t feel it quite as much as the Nike Streakfly, which has a similar carbon shank. The Goodyear rubber has good coverage on most of the outsole, but it’s thin, and I think it could get worn out quickly. I would like to see a little more rubber, even if it added more weight to the shoe.

JORDYNN: You’ll literally get no complaints from me in the performance department. I believe the only thing that might set this shoe back is its namesake. The cool kids don’t necessarily go for the Skechers section of the shoe store unless they’re in the know of the brand and its reliability.

Shop Skechers Razor Excess 2 – Men Shop Skechers Razor Excess 2 – Women

Arch Fit heel logo

Skechers Razor Excess 2 Conclusion

ROBBE: Overall, this is pretty similar to the original Razor Excess, which you can get for almost half the price right now. There’s slightly more cushion, and you do get that arch support for the insole, so it’s not totally the same. You may be able to go a bit longer in this version, though beware of the upper if you have inside toe issues with other shoes. That said, for the versatility and enjoyable ride, the $140 price point is a better deal than comp shoes in its range like the Endorphin Speed or Takumi Sen 8.

JAYTON: I have very few complaints about the Skecher Razor Excess 2, and I plan on keeping the shoe in my current rotation. Priced at $140, I feel like this is a decent competitor for similar shoes at this price point, like the Hoka Rincon 3 and Brooks Ghost 14.

JORDYNN: The Skechers Razor Excess 2 is an all-around contender in my book. It has the specs and engineering design of a sprint shoe and the durable yet light, energy-returning structure of a distance shoe to save your tools some wear and tear. Whether your goal is near or far, the Razor Excess 2 will be a dependable adage to get you there.

You can pick up the Skechers Razor Excess 2 for $140 at Running Warehouse (featuring free 2-day shipping and 90-day returns) by using the shop link below.

Shop Skechers Razor Excess 2 – Men Shop Skechers Razor Excess 2 – Women

skechers razor excess 2 angle

Jayton is a runner who completed his first marathon during his first IRONMAN in 2021. He is a senior at Texas A&M University and will graduate in 2022 with a degree in Communications and Journalism.

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